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Anticipating and Preparing for Emerging Skills and Jobs

By Dominique Slade04.01.18InGeneralComments 0

Back in December, I attended the Asian Development Bank 7th Skills Forum on Anticipating and Preparing for Emerging Skills and Jobs. As Head of Technical and Vocational Pathways at Cambridge International, I believe this topic is crucial.

We must actively prepare learners for the world of the future if we don’t want to fail whole generations of young people – not just youth with low or inexistent skills but increasingly high school or higher education graduates without the right skills for employment. The Forum started with two inspiring keynote presentations: Dr Carl Frey, Oxford University, presented the ‘fourth industrial revolution’ from a historical perspective, by asking the question: The Future of Skills and jobs: Is this time different?

The second presentation, by Dr Paul Kim from Stanford University, focused on The Fourth Industrial Revolution and its Implications for Education. The difference in style between the two presentations was in itself an illustration of the main change brought about by the digital revolution – pace! For Dr Kim the main disruptor for education today is Artificial Intelligence and its underpinning big data technology.

Dr Kim’s key message, in true digital language, is that education does not need tweaking but a complete re-boot. How we learn in the future needs to go hand in hand with the other key question: what should we learn in the future? Introducing new technologies for teaching and learning must not only include sound reflection about how pedagogy has to be re-thought carefully to make the most of what technology has to offer but also essential re-thinking of what we should teach.

The ADB forum brought together a range of different education stakeholders such as policy makers, practioners, experts, employers, and social entrepreneurs.

It prompted rich discussions and some clear leads in terms of qualities and skills essential for the future:

Curiosity, ability to question and to research

Innovation and creativity

Multi-disciplinarity and ability to connect,develop own networks, to empathise and collaborate

Adaptability, responsiveness, agility;

STEM education, designing and making, understanding and use of data;

Entrepreneurship/social entrepreneurship, leadership, ability to explore/let others explore new ideas,

Coping with and learning from failure

Autonomy, learning to learn, life-long learning

Nothing of this is new but there is a shift, the ‘soft’ skills of the past are becoming the ‘hard’ skills of the future. Dr Kim illustrated this with a quote from Alvin Toffler: The illiterates of the 21s century will not be those who cannot read and write but those who cannot learn, unlearn and relearn.

Dr Kim presented SMILE (Stanford Mobile Inquiry-Based Learning Environment), a mobile learning platform designed to help students study school subject matter, develop higher order learning skills and generate transparent real-time learning analytics. Here is a school resource that can support learners to develop holistically the knowledge, skills and qualities that they will need to strive in tomorrow’s world. It is an example of how school leaders and teachers will have to unlearn and relearn new approaches to teaching and learning if they are committed to preparing their students for the future.

Here at Cambridge International we have been following closely the development of our new international headquarters in Cambridge, called the Triangle. Our new office from March 2018 will reflect the working practices of the future – a flexible, open plan environment equipped with the latest technology and plenty of breakout spaces where workers can reinvigorate their focus. The idea is to encourage and facilitate collaboration and innovation. This move will bring the whole of the Cambridge Assessment Group under one roof and coincides with our re-branding as Cambridge Assessment International Education, a more integrated global organisation, and an enhanced mission – how we’ll work and what we’ll do in the future re-thought at the same time.

We must approach education in the same way: not only re-think pedagogy in the digital age but also re-think holistically about the whole school environment and what we teach our children if we want to prepare them for the world of the future.

By Dominique Slade

Dominique is Head of Technical and Vocational Pathways and part of the Education Services team at Cambridge International Examinations.

View all posts by Dominique Slade

Tweets by @CIE_Education

© 2018 Cambridge International Examinations

App, Cambridge, Communication, Creativity, Education, Grammar Guide, Human Rights Education, Lesson Plan, Life Long Learning, Links, Literature, Magazine, Media, Moral Education, New Curriculum, Poetry, Postgraduate studies, Prose, Public Speaking, Resources, SDG, Training, UN Sustainable Development in Education, UniUN17, مجلة, Workshop, Writing, Writing Style, Writing Tip, اللغة الانكليزية, اللغة العربية, الانكليزي, الانكليزية, تدريب

Anticipating and Preparing for Emerging Skills and Jobs

By Dominique Slade04.01.18InGeneralComments 0

Back in December, I attended the Asian Development Bank 7th Skills Forum on Anticipating and Preparing for Emerging Skills and Jobs. As Head of Technical and Vocational Pathways at Cambridge International, I believe this topic is crucial.

We must actively prepare learners for the world of the future if we don’t want to fail whole generations of young people – not just youth with low or inexistent skills but increasingly high school or higher education graduates without the right skills for employment. The Forum started with two inspiring keynote presentations: Dr Carl Frey, Oxford University, presented the ‘fourth industrial revolution’ from a historical perspective, by asking the question: The Future of Skills and jobs: Is this time different?

The second presentation, by Dr Paul Kim from Stanford University, focused on The Fourth Industrial Revolution and its Implications for Education. The difference in style between the two presentations was in itself an illustration of the main change brought about by the digital revolution – pace! For Dr Kim the main disruptor for education today is Artificial Intelligence and its underpinning big data technology.

Dr Kim’s key message, in true digital language, is that education does not need tweaking but a complete re-boot. How we learn in the future needs to go hand in hand with the other key question: what should we learn in the future? Introducing new technologies for teaching and learning must not only include sound reflection about how pedagogy has to be re-thought carefully to make the most of what technology has to offer but also essential re-thinking of what we should teach.

The ADB forum brought together a range of different education stakeholders such as policy makers, practioners, experts, employers, and social entrepreneurs.

It prompted rich discussions and some clear leads in terms of qualities and skills essential for the future:

Curiosity, ability to question and to research

Innovation and creativity

Multi-disciplinarity and ability to connect,develop own networks, to empathise and collaborate

Adaptability, responsiveness, agility;

STEM education, designing and making, understanding and use of data;

Entrepreneurship/social entrepreneurship, leadership, ability to explore/let others explore new ideas,

Coping with and learning from failure

Autonomy, learning to learn, life-long learning

Nothing of this is new but there is a shift, the ‘soft’ skills of the past are becoming the ‘hard’ skills of the future. Dr Kim illustrated this with a quote from Alvin Toffler: The illiterates of the 21s century will not be those who cannot read and write but those who cannot learn, unlearn and relearn.

Dr Kim presented SMILE (Stanford Mobile Inquiry-Based Learning Environment), a mobile learning platform designed to help students study school subject matter, develop higher order learning skills and generate transparent real-time learning analytics. Here is a school resource that can support learners to develop holistically the knowledge, skills and qualities that they will need to strive in tomorrow’s world. It is an example of how school leaders and teachers will have to unlearn and relearn new approaches to teaching and learning if they are committed to preparing their students for the future.

Here at Cambridge International we have been following closely the development of our new international headquarters in Cambridge, called the Triangle. Our new office from March 2018 will reflect the working practices of the future – a flexible, open plan environment equipped with the latest technology and plenty of breakout spaces where workers can reinvigorate their focus. The idea is to encourage and facilitate collaboration and innovation. This move will bring the whole of the Cambridge Assessment Group under one roof and coincides with our re-branding as Cambridge Assessment International Education, a more integrated global organisation, and an enhanced mission – how we’ll work and what we’ll do in the future re-thought at the same time.

We must approach education in the same way: not only re-think pedagogy in the digital age but also re-think holistically about the whole school environment and what we teach our children if we want to prepare them for the world of the future.

By Dominique Slade

Dominique is Head of Technical and Vocational Pathways and part of the Education Services team at Cambridge International Examinations.

View all posts by Dominique Slade

Tweets by @CIE_Education

© 2018 Cambridge International Examinations

Links, Media, NGOs, Poetry, Prose, Trainer Post, Writing

Love you #Mamma & #Papa | #FamilyDay #UN | @WorldWeWant2030 #SaveSouls #ShutDOWNarms

Dear NGOs, please make your utmost effort to shut down manufacturer producing arms and stop arms trading and top presidents making profits on behalf of our blood. 

World NGOs have marked all sorts of days except #SaveSouls #ShutDOWNarms

Mothers and fathers loosing their sons for the sake of homeland, dignity and higher purpose, do still need them when they get older. Their sighs for missing them and longing to see them in the morning or coming back in the evening, hearing their voice aloud filling all the corners of every room at home – this missing will burn their hearts and wish they had died years and years before they received that bad news- our lions buried. Criminals immunity. Top NGOs silent. Aids flow. Cash money granted. Oh, no. There is a big misunderstanding here. We need not your money. We need that you kill warmongers greedy and lust to  make more money. Our lands is not a chess. Not a monopoly. Not a plastic world lamp 🌍 by which you decorate your office and salon plotting where to conquer next. Our lands are ours. Stay overseas. Stay relaxed. The Creator has provided the little worm stuck on a stone in a vast ocean its food supply to stay alive, grateful and teacher for us to get satisfied. This universe has made especially for humans who well behave and get more excellent even from pure angels. This universe is made especially for us to behave as humans – animals and plants, water and winds, birds and lions have all been to serve our needs not greediness and bank credits, not our posts, statuses and signatures. We are hear to love our mums and dads, support brothers and sisters, form that beautiful tie and unity and be radiant of beauty in the wider net. We are hear to inspire and reflect- reflect Allah’s beauty, purity, mercy and and and.


I am sorry mums and dads; your eyes have been full of burning tears and all are deaf. 

I can hear your cries deep in your hearts; heal from remote and ask God exceed the arrival of the Mahdi and Jesus whether we deserve or not. 

Intervene and proper our wishes and have Your plan that covers all what we need; let us not lost, not missed; not injured, sick or buried in the jungle of criminals while we seek to touch the wings of your angels and swim in the river of your life in peace, in harmony in love. 

You have sent me here and told me that ab African is a brother to Arabian and Arabian to European and do on and on. 

Dear God,  intervene now Abd heal the hearts of mothers first; dads’ next and mine the days that follow so that I enjoy triple of what I thought. Dear God! Mum the first and I am the last. 



Fatima al Khansa 

فاطما

والعشق لفاطمة بنت محمد 

اولنا محمد واوسطنا محمد وكلنا محمد 

صلوا على محمد وال محمد 

#Yemen #Bahrain #Lebanon #Iraq and the whole world 🌍 

“♦- I hope… – A letter from Mom and Dad } received 1k like

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Omar Khayyam 

https://www.google.com.lb/search?q=Omar+Khayyam&oq=Omar+Khayyam&aqs=chrome..69i57j0l3.3510j0j4&client=ms-android-sonymobile&sourceid=chrome-mobile&ie=UTF-8